Romans and Royals

This week has had a distinctly historical flavour. We have viewed Iron Age barrows and hill forts on the Cotswold Way. Some of the walk has been followed the Monarch’s Way which was a long distance footpath based on the flight of Charles II going into exile abroad after defeat in the battle of Worcester in 1651. We have visited and enjoyed the city of Bath with its Roman baths, Georgian architecture and pump house and Jane Austin centre.

Jane Austin centre in bath
Jane Austin centre in bath
John in Bath
John in Bath

We have stayed in Tetbury with its history of the wool trade and many beautiful old buildings in the town centre. This is the parish which contains Highgrove, the residence of Prince Charles’ though he couldn’t get back from the Royal wedding in time to greet us as we walked past his back fence!

Tetbury wool market
Tetbury wool market

We have been to Cirencester which also has a Roman past. As there was a May bank holiday, we had a rest from walking and visited the Corinium museum which houses a fantastic collection of Roman artefacts including many beautiful mosaics, a Roman garden and some talking headstones.

We went to Cirencester which has a Roman past. As there was a May bank holiday, we had a rest from walking and visited the Corinium museum which houses a fantastic collection of Roman artefacts including many beautiful mosaics, a Roman garden and some talking headstones. Some of our walk took us along the Cotswold Way and so we walked past the Manor house where Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn stayed and into Old Sodbury church where William Tyndale had been inspired to translate the Bible into English. A special day came when Jack (with whom we were staying) took us to see the church and stately house which featured in ‘From Larkrise to Candleford’ and a gem of a church at Boxwell which had a coat of arms originally made for William III but then adapted for Queen Anne. It also featured a gravestone for Whippy who carried his master Captain Shakespeare at the battle of Waterloo. En route we drove past Beverston castle where Cromwell is reputed to have signed the death warrant for Charles I and then later the same day visited a cemetery for Australian airforcemen killed while training in the First world War.

The walking has continued to go well and folk have asked and expressed and interest in what we are doing. A special mention to twins Maddie and Daisy and their mum whom we met in Tesco as we got supplies!

Cirencester mosaic
Cirencester mosaic

Week 5 Statistics

Scrabble: Nancy 1 John 5

Trig Points 1

Kissing Gates 40

En route donations £28

Bath buns 2

Double Gloucester cheese 250 g

Iron Age hill forts 5

Nancy

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s